Homeowner Recovery Program Frequently Asked Questions

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My home was damaged by Hurricane Florence and/or Hurricane Matthew. Is assistance available for me?

Yes, assistance is now available through ReBuild NC, which was established by the North Carolina Office of Recovery and Resiliency (NCORR) to assist North Carolina residents whose homes were damaged as a result of Hurricane Florence on September 14, 2018, and/or Hurricane Matthew on October 8, 2016. The ReBuild NC Homeowner Recovery Program (HRP) is now accepting applications from impacted homeowners. Eligible homeowners may receive assistance repairing, replacing, elevating, and/or reconstructing their damaged homes. The program may also provide reimbursement for repairs already completed. Please visit www.rebuild.nc.gov to begin an application or call 833-ASK-RBNC (833-275-7262)

I already completed a ReBuild NC application – should I complete another one?

No, if you already completed a ReBuild NC application during Phase 1 of the Homeowner Recovery Program (2017-2019), there is no need to complete a second application. Please call 833-ASK-RBNC (833-275-7262) to be connected with your Case Manager. If you previously applied and were determined ineligible for assistance, you may now be eligible due to policy updates. Your Case Manager will be glad to review the status of your application and assist you with any next steps. 

I applied for assistance from another organization – does that mean I'm already signed up for ReBuild NC?

No, to apply for assistance from ReBuild NC, you must submit a ReBuild NC application. The application can be completed online by clicking here. Assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Small Business Administration (SBA), Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP), a volunteer group, insurance, etc. is separate from ReBuild NC. 

What counties are eligible for recovery assistance?

To be eligible for assistance from the Homeowner Recovery Program, your home must be located in a county that received a federal disaster declaration as a result of Hurricane Matthew and/or Hurricane Florence.

Hurricane Matthew-Impacted Counties
  • Camden
  • Chowan
  • Currituck
  • Edgecombe
  • Franklin
  • Gates
  • Halifax
  • Hertford
  • Martin
  • Nash
  • Northampton
  • Pasquotank
  • Perquimans
  • Wake
  • Warren
  • Washington
Hurricane Florence-Impacted Counties
  • Alamance
  • Alleghany
  • Ashe
  • Cabarrus
  • Davidson
  • Durham
  • Granville
  • Guilford
  • Madison
  • McDowell
  • Orange
  • Person
  • Polk
  • Randolph
  • Rowan
  • Stanly
  • Union
  • Yancey
Hurricane Matthew AND Hurricane Florence-Impacted Counties
  • Anson
  • Beaufort
  • Bertie
  • Bladen
  • Brunswick
  • Carteret
  • Chatham
  • Columbus
  • Craven
  • Cumberland
  • Dare
  • Duplin
  • Greene
  • Harnett
  • Hoke
  • Hyde
  • Johnston
  • Jones
  • Lee
  • Lenoir
  • Montgomery
  • Moore
  • New Hanover
  • Onslow
  • Pamlico
  • Pender
  • Pitt
  • Richmond
  • Robeson
  • Sampson
  • Scotland
  • Tyrrell
  • Wayne
  • Wilson

I need additional assistance to complete my ReBuild NC application. What should I do?

If your hearing or eyesight is impaired, or if you have a disability and may require additional accommodations, we are glad to assist you with navigating the application process. Please call 833-ASK-RBNC (833-275-7262) to speak with a program representative who will assist you accordingly. 

Does ReBuild NC have interpreters available?

Yes, multilingual staff are available. Please call 833-ASK-RBNC (833-275-7262) to indicate what translation is needed. Si habla Español. 

Is the program experiencing a delay in mail operations due to COVID-19? 

As you may have already experienced, we utilize the USPS system to aid us in the process of document exchange with our applicants. Please note that, as also shared in news outlets, USPS products and packing may require more time to be delivered due to limited transportation availability as a result of the ongoing COVID-19 impacts. As a result, we are likewise impacted and are therefore experiencing delays in our USPS mail operations as well. If you chose to use USPS, we ask for your patience as we safely work to process your application and documents. We apologize for this inconvenience and appreciate your understanding. Please know we will work to safely re-open our operations in phases as the pandemic conditions evolve, and in the meantime, you are welcome to exchange documentation with the program via curbside appointment or email; to email with a program representative, please contact ask-rbnc@rebuild.nc.gov or your Case Manager directly. For more information regarding USPS delivery changes, please go to https://faq.usps.com/

Who can I contact regarding a question about the status of my application?

If you have a question about the status of your application, please call your Case Manager or 833-ASK-RBNC (833-275-7262) to speak with a program representative. The program representative may direct your call to another team member who can best answer your question. 

How can I make a change to the application I submitted, and/or how do I submit additional documentation?

If you need to change something on your application and/or submit additional documentation, please call your Case Manager or 833-ASK-RBNC (833-275-7262) to speak with a program representative. The program representative may direct your call to another team member who can best answer your question. 

How do I submit a complaint?

Anyone may submit a complaint at any point throughout their participation in the program. To submit a complaint, please call your Case Manager, call 833-ASK-RBNC (833-275-7262), or email info@rebuild.nc.gov
 

How do I apply? 

To apply to the ReBuild NC Homeowner Recovery Program, please visit www.rebuild.nc.gov to complete an application online. You are also welcome to give us a call at 833-ASK-RBNC (833-275-7262) from 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m., Monday – Friday. If you would prefer to receive an application by mail or email, please call or email ask-rbnc@rebuild.nc.gov.

Is there a deadline to apply?

There is currently no deadline to apply to the Homeowner Recovery Program, and any deadlines that are established in the future will be announced by the program on www.rebuild.nc.gov. However, we strongly encourage anyone interested in the program to submit an application as soon as possible. 

What documentation is required?

In addition to a completed application, supporting documentation and forms must also be submitted.

I submitted my application – what is the next step? 

A program representative will assist you with completing your application and ensuring you have submitted all required supporting documentation and forms. Once all documents have been submitted, the program will begin a comprehensive review of your application. Once your application and required documentation are submitted, you will be assigned a Case Manager who will be your point of contact throughout your participation in the program. 

The program will review your application with regard to all eligibility criteria. If the criteria are met, the program will then verify any disaster assistance you received from other sources, such as FEMA, SBA, and insurance, and contact you to schedule necessary inspections of your damaged home. Inspections will include an environmental review, a damage inspection, an asbestos building survey, and for homes built before 1978, a lead-based paint assessment. 

Once the program completes its review of your application, as well as all inspections, your award amount will be determined and made available for you to review. Once you review your award letter, you may accept the award, submit an appeal, request an award consultation, or withdraw from the program.

An overview of the 8-Step Process is available here. 

Why do I need to stop work once I submit my application?

Remodeling, additions, rebuilding, reconstruction, and major refurbishment of the structure itself should stop after applying to the program as the program is calculating your award based on the nature of repairs required.    

What is the definition of an emergency repair?

According to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, emergency repairs meet the following definition: 

1.    Emergency repairs "do not alter environmental conditions" including any of the following:

  • Affect significant elements of properties listed on or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places
  • Replace, either through rebuilding or major rehabilitation of, structures within a floodplain
  • Involve inappropriate occupancy of a known hazardous site or site contiguous to a known hazardous site
  • Involve work that could adversely impact the habitat of an endangered species, and alter a building's footprint

2.    Emergency repairs are "limited to protection, repair, or restoration activities necessary to control or arrest the effects": The activity does not include new additions, relocation, or enlargements, or changes to the primary use or density of occupancy; and includes work that:

  • Provides temporary protection from further damage to a building or that makes permanent repairs to a damaged building or structure.
  • Is for the restoration of essential community services and related utilities and facilities to their condition prior to the disaster without significant change in size or capacity.

3.    Emergency repairs are necessary "only to control or arrest the effects from a state or federally declared public disaster or imminent threats to the public safety including those resulting from physical deterioration."

What types of repairs are considered emergency repairs?

Emergency repairs are those that do not alter the environmental conditions of the property, such as through rebuilding or major repairs and are limited to repairs that are necessary to prevent imminent threats to safety, such as those resulting from physical deterioration from the structure following a disaster. Examples may include replacing an HVAC system, repairing roof damage, and repairing flooring at risk of caving in. If you would like to request program approval of an emergency repair, please complete the Emergency Repair Request Form available here.

I was notified about being involuntarily withdrawn from the program. What are my next steps?

You have the right to appeal.
    

I withdrew my application from the program. Can I reinstate my application?

Applicants may choose to withdraw their application from the program and will receive a written confirmation upon doing so. If you choose to reinstate your program application, feel that you are receiving correspondence about your withdrawal in error, or have any additional questions, please contact your ReBuild NC Case Manager or call 833-ASK-RBNC (833-275-7262) to speak with a program representative as soon as possible.
 

Am I eligible? 

Eligibility criteria for the Homeowner Recovery Program include the following:

  • Your home must have been damaged as a direct result of Hurricane Florence and/or Hurricane Matthew.
  • You must have owned the damaged home at the time of the disaster (Hurricane Florence on September 14, 2018, and/or Hurricane Matthew on October 8, 2016), and you must still own the home. 
  • You must have occupied the damaged home as a primary residence at the time of the disaster. 
  • You must be lawfully present in the United States. Individuals prohibited from receiving federal public benefits from the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act may not receive assistance from ReBuild NC. 
  • Your total household income must be at or below 150 percent of the Area Median Income (AMI) limit.  
  • The damaged home must be an eligible structure type and located in a disaster-declared county. 

For more information about these and other eligibility criteria, please view the Homeowner Recovery Program Manual, available here.  

I sold my home – am I still eligible for assistance?

No, to be eligible for assistance from ReBuild NC, homeowners must maintain ownership of the damaged property throughout their participation in the program. Applicants certify when completing the application that they understand they must not transfer the damaged property, or any interest in it, whether voluntarily or involuntarily until they have completed all repair or reconstruction work through the program and/or the program has completed closeout of the application.  

What structure types are eligible to receive assistance?

Eligible structure types include single-family homes, modular homes, manufactured home units (mobile homes), duplexes, condos/townhomes, and co-ops. 

What is DOB?

Duplication of Benefits (DOB) is the receipt of funding from multiple sources for the same purpose. The Robert T. Stafford Disaster Assistance and Emergency Relief Act (Stafford Act) prohibits any person, business concern, or other entity from receiving financial assistance from Community Development Block Grant – Disaster Recovery (CDBG-DR) funding with respect to any part of the loss resulting from a major disaster for which they have already received financial assistance under any other program or from insurance or any other sources. It is an amount determined by the program that may result in the reduction in the award value.

I received assistance after Hurricane Florence and/or Hurricane Matthew – how will this impact the assistance I can receive from ReBuild NC?

Receiving other means of assistance, such as assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Small Business Administration (SBA), U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), private flood insurance, or any other source for which funds are designated toward the rehabilitation or reconstruction of your structure does not disqualify you from receiving assistance from the Homeowner Recovery Program. However, it may impact the amount of funding for which you may qualify. For more information, please view the “What is DOB?” FAQ.

I received an SBA loan – how will this impact the assistance I can receive from ReBuild NC? 

If you applied for and received a loan from the Small Business Administration (SBA) for home repairs following Hurricane Matthew and/or Hurricane Florence, only the amount of the loan that was received will be considered a Duplication of Benefits (DOB). If you declined or canceled all or a portion of the loan you were approved for, that amount will not be factored into your award calculation and you will be requested to complete a Subsidized Loan Affidavit prior to receiving program assistance. 

If I draw down more money from my active SBA loan, how will that impact the assistance I can receive from ReBuild NC? 

You must sign and complete the program’s Subsidized Loan Affidavit (a program representative will provide this form) stating that you will not accept any more of your available loan funds without ReBuild NC approval. A copy of the affidavit will then be sent to SBA. If you decide to accept more loan funds, the program will consider that amount an additional Duplication of Benefits (DOB) and adjust your award calculation accordingly. For more information about DOB, please view the “What is DOB?” FAQ.

I had flood insurance – can I still receive assistance from ReBuild NC?

If you had a flood insurance policy in place at the time of the disaster and received flood insurance funds, it does not make you ineligible for assistance, although it may impact the amount of funding you receive. For more information, please view the “What is DOB?” FAQ. 

I did not have flood insurance – can I still receive assistance from ReBuild NC?

If you were impacted by Hurricane Florence, your damaged property is located within the 100-year floodplain, you did not carry flood insurance at the time of the disaster, and your total household income is equal to or greater than 120 percent of the Area Median Income (AMI), you are not able to receive assistance from the Homeowner Recovery Program. If you did not live in a 100-year floodplain and were not otherwise required to maintain flood insurance due to receiving previous federal disaster assistance, there is no program eligibility requirement related to maintaining flood insurance. 

If you are unsure whether the damaged property is in a 100-year floodplain – also called a Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) – please visit FEMA’s Flood Map Service Center at https://msc.fema.gov/portal/home.

I previously received federal assistance after a disaster and was required to maintain flood insurance – can I still receive assistance from ReBuild NC? 

If your damaged property received federal assistance after a previous disaster, e.g., FEMA Individual Assistance following a hurricane, and you were required to maintain flood insurance, you must have maintained continuous flood insurance since that time to remain eligible for additional federal assistance, such as a ReBuild NC award. 

Why do I need to complete the Insurance Disclosure Certification?

The program is required by federal law to verify the amount of assistance an applicant previously received for home repairs following the disaster for which they are claiming damage. The program uses the Insurance Disclosure Certification to gather information about any assistance you previously received. It then considers the amount of received assistance when calculating your total award amount. For more information, please view the “What is DOB?” FAQ.
 

Why does my home need to be inspected?

The program uses inspections for a variety of purposes, including identifying storm damage, completed repairs, and outstanding repair needs. Without completed inspections, the program is unable to calculate your award, and you are unable to move forward in the program. 

What is a damage inspection? 

During the damage inspection, a program representative will perform a detailed inspection of the interior and exterior of your home to determine what work remains, as well as what repairs have already been completed. All previously completed repairs will be documented in the Damage Repair Verification (DRV).

As part of the damage inspection, the inspector will determine whether an additional structural inspection is needed. For properties located in a Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA), the inspector will also assess the elevation of the property and whether the structure is elevated appropriately – to at least two feet above the Base Flood Elevation (BFE) and/or the highest watermark, whichever is higher. 

The damage inspector will also create an itemized report of all remaining repair items, called the Estimated Cost of Repairs (ECR). The ECR is based on economy/standard-grade materials. Both the DRV and the ECR will be provided to you at the time of your award determination. 

What is a lead-based paint assessment?

All homes constructed before 1978 are federally required to receive a lead-based paint assessment. The program’s lead-based paint assessor will test your paint, take samples of the soil outside, and sample the dust on floors and windowsills inside. The assessor will need to inspect both the interior and exterior of the home.

What is an asbestos building survey?

All homes must receive an asbestos building survey, which is required by federal law to ensure that damaged properties are free of hazardous, asbestos-containing materials that could affect the health of the home’s occupants. During the asbestos building survey, the program’s asbestos inspector will inspect the damaged property and take samples to determine whether hazardous materials are present, as well as determine any needs for their disposal. 

What is an environmental review?

An environmental review is the process of reviewing a construction project to ensure it does not result in adverse impacts to the environment or cultural heritage, while also ensuring there will be no adverse environmental impacts on the project. This review process ensures the construction project complies with federal environmental and historic preservation laws, statutes, and executive orders. As part of this review, an environmental site inspection is performed. An appointment will be made for the inspection. While an environmental inspector will require access to the property, they do not typically require entrance into your home unless structural access is specifically requested when the appointment is made. 

What is an elevation certificate, and why do I need one?

Elevation certificates may be obtained from your local municipality and are used by the program to understand your home’s elevation as it relates to the Base Flood Elevation (BFE). In the case that an elevation certificate cannot be obtained from your local municipality, an inspector may need to go out and survey the home to develop one. Per federal law, all residential structures located in a Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) that receive federal assistance for new construction, repair of substantial damage, or substantial improvement, must be elevated with the lowest floor, including the basement, at least two feet above the 1 percent annual floodplain elevation (appropriately – to at least two feet above the Base Flood Elevation (BFE) and/or the highest watermark, whichever is higher.

How is ReBuild NC ensuring homeowner safety during program inspections amid COVID-19?

During COVID-19, the program is taking safety precautions to help ensure the health and safety of applicants, household members, and program staff. We are closely monitoring program inspectors and taking necessary steps to avoid the potential spread of the virus by conducting regular testing, taking temperatures daily, encouraging frequent and thorough hand washing, and requiring staff to report if they experience any symptoms or suspect they may have been exposed to COVID-19. Once onsite at your damaged property, inspectors are required to wear masks, gloves, and maintain physical distance of at least 6 feet both indoors and outdoors. 

We kindly ask that you assist us with performing a contactless inspection by minimizing the number of people inside your home during the inspection if possible, and otherwise doing what you can to ensure we are able to maintain at least 6 feet of distance with the inspector. We also ask that you, and anyone else present for the inspection, wear a mask, especially when in proximity to the inspector. If you or any member of your household suspects that they may have been exposed to COVID-19, please notify the program as soon as possible before the inspection. We would be glad to reschedule the inspection after a 14-day period. 

The North Carolina Office of Recovery and Resiliency (NCORR) continues to evaluate overall efforts to ensure the health and safety of everyone served by the program remains a top priority. Please feel welcome to call 833-ASK-RBNC (833-275-7262) if you have any questions about the program’s safety measures during COVID-19. 
 

What types of assistance are available?

Reconstruction and Rehabilitation of Single Family Homes; the Replacement or Rehabilitation of Mobile Homes.

Is the HOPE Program part of the Homeowner Recovery Program?

The Housing Opportunities and Prevention of Evictions (HOPE) Program – which offers rental and utilities assistance – is NOT part of the ReBuild NC Homeowner Recovery Program. HOPE Program applicants, or individuals seeking information about the HOPE Program, are encouraged to visit www.hope.nc.gov.
 

How are awards calculated?

During the damage inspection, a program representative will perform a detailed inspection of your home to determine a dollar amount (based on economy/standard-grade materials) for the work already completed on your home and the work that remains. The program will also review any disaster assistance you received from other sources, such as FEMA, SBA, or insurance. Because federal law requires the accounting of other benefits in calculating the award, the amount of other disaster assistance received for the relevant disaster event will be subtracted from the dollar amount determined through the damage inspection. These amounts will be considered against maximum potential program award amounts.

When should I expect to receive assistance from the program?

Once you have submitted a complete application as well as all required supporting documentation and forms, the program will begin a comprehensive review of your application. The program will review your application with regard to all eligibility criteria. If the criteria are met, the program will then calculate any disaster assistance you received from other sources, such as FEMA, SBA, and insurance, and contact you to schedule necessary inspections of your damaged home. Inspections will include an environmental review, a damage inspection, an asbestos building survey, and for homes built before 1978, a lead-based paint assessment. 

Once the program completes its review of your application, as well as all inspections, your award amount will be determined and made available for you to review. Once you review your award letter, you may accept the award, submit an appeal, request an award consultation, or withdraw from the program. 

An overview of the 8-step Process is available here. 

Does the Homeowner Recovery Program offer reimbursement awards?

No, the time period for this award type has ended.

Why is my Damage Repair Verification (DRV) estimate less than the amount I spent to repair my home? 

The DRV is based on a detailed inspection of completed repairs and utilizes economy/standard-grade pricing for each repair item. While the program recognizes that homeowners may not have repaired their home using economy/standard-grade materials, the purpose of federal funding allocated to ReBuild NC is to ensure homeowners can get back into a safe, fully repaired or reconstructed home. As such, reimbursement funding is intended to cover the cost of necessary repairs rather than compensate homeowners for the full extent of their losses following Hurricane Matthew and/or Hurricane Florence. In utilizing standard, economy-grade materials, the program also ensures that eligible homeowners receive the same funding for the same repair items and that available funding can assist the greatest number of applicants. 

If I receive an award from the Homeowner Recovery Program, will I be required to pay it back?

No, the Homeowner Recovery Program provides funding in the form of a grant, which does not have to be paid back unless you violate any of the Applicant Certifications included within the application or the terms of your Homeowner Grant Agreement, which is a binding legal document between applicants and the North Carolina Office of Recovery and Resiliency (NCORR). Activities that will result in a repayment of funds to the program include but are not limited to: withdrawing from the program while construction is taking place; receiving a reimbursement check but refusing to allow the program to complete remaining repairs, and receiving additional disaster assistance that is considered a Duplication of Benefits (DOB). 

Why do I have the option to elevate? 

The program offers optional elevation to eligible applicants whose damaged property is outside the 100-year flood plain, received at least 6 inches of floodwaters from Hurricane Matthew and/or Hurricane Florence, and is considered substantially damaged or would be substantially improved. This option is a preventative measure against any future flooding. If you choose the optional elevation assistance, your home will be reconstructed or replaced and will be elevated to the highest elevation of either two (2) feet above the Base Flood Elevation (BFE) or at least two (2) feet above the highest level of water impacting the home that can be documented.

I accepted optional elevation and am now eligible for reconstruction or replacement assistance. Why was my award switched from rehabilitation to reconstruction/replacement?

If a homeowner who initially was calculated to receive a rehabilitation award accepts their optional elevation, their award is automatically changed to a reconstruction (stick-build/modular) or replacement (MHU) award. This is because the current home must be demolished in order to for a new home to be built and elevated to the highest elevation of either two (2) feet above the Base Flood Elevation (BFE) or at least two (2) feet above the highest level of water impacting the home that can be documented.

I am eligible for a reconstruction. Will I get to choose my new floorplan?

Yes – you may choose from two floorplans. The program offers two-, three-, four- and five-bedroom options. To view more information on specific floorplan layouts, click here to view a complete list. 

I am eligible for a replacement mobile home. Do I get to choose my new floorplan?

No, you will be awarded a floorplan that fits your particular needs as determined in your award calculation.

Why does the program ask for my household composition at Step 5?

The program must verify whether any change occurred in your household composition before calculating an award to ensure your award amount is correctly calculated. The number of household members is used to calculate your award amount and, if there have been any changes since you completed the application, it may result in adjustments to elements of your grant agreement, such as the floorplan(s) you are eligible for if your home will be reconstructed or replaced, and/or temporary relocation assistance. The program also looks at total household income to ensure the award is consistent with program guidelines. 

How can I submit my escrow check? 

Cashier’s check or money order are the only acceptable forms of payment for escrow and must be made payable to NCORR. Payment should be mailed to NCORR, PO Box 110465, Durham, NC 27709.

Why do I have an escrow balance? 

You received additional assistance from other sources, such as FEMA, SBA, Homeowners Insurance, etc. and the amount you received is higher than what the Damage Repair Verification (DRV) inspection revealed, which is considered a Duplication of Benefits (DOB). This DOB excess is also known as an escrow balance. Before the program can move forward with any assistance, you will need to provide the program with the DOB excess/escrow to go toward the program-managed repair, reconstruction, or replacement of your home. 

Why must I provide proof of flood insurance?

If your property is located within a Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA), proof of flood insurance must be provided to the program. The Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973 requires that homes receiving federal assistance and located in a SFHA be covered by flood insurance under the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). Failure to maintain flood insurance on the property will result in the damaged property being disqualified from receiving any future federal disaster recovery assistance. 

Why do I need approval from my lienholder to reconstruct or replace my home? 

The program must have permission from your lienholder before moving forward with demolition and reconstruction or replacement of a damaged home. This is necessary because the lienholder holds an interest in the property and must be notified of any changes and the transfer of collateral, if needed. The lien will continue as-is throughout the process and no additional funds will be added. If you have a mobile home that is replaced by the program, then the lien will be applied to the replacement mobile home. 

What is a grant signing?

A homeowner will sign their Homeowner Grant Agreement (HOGA) when they receive their Award/HOGA packet, which outlines their eligible grant. 

How do I file an appeal? 

A written appeal must be submitted to the Appeals Department within thirty (30) days of the date on the program award or eligibility determination letter using the ReBuild NC Appeal Request Form. You may submit your appeal via U.S. mail to the address listed below, email (appeals@rebuild.nc.gov), or dropping it off at the nearest ReBuild NC Center. (Note: During COVID-19, ReBuild NC Centers are closed to the public but curbside appointments for program-related document pick up and drop off can be scheduled by calling 833-ASK-RBNC (833-275-7262).)

ReBuild NC Appeals Team
ATTN: Homeowner Recovery Program
North Carolina Office of Recovery and Resiliency
PO Box 110465
Durham, North Carolina 27709

What am I allowed to appeal? 

You may file a written appeal related to any written determination made by the program that affects your eligibility or assistance amount. An appeal will not be considered if you are appealing a federal regulation or underlying program policy, or appealing after signing your Homeowner Grant Agreement.

What do I need to provide when filing an appeal? 

To be considered a valid appeal, you must provide the following a signed Request for an Appeal Form, a written statement detailing what you are appealing and the basis for the appeal, and additional documents in support of the appeal. A program representative will reach out to you if additional documentation is required to process the appeal.

Is there a deadline for filing an appeal? 

A written appeal must be submitted to the Appeals Department within thirty (30) days of the date on the program award or eligibility determination letter. 

If I change my mind, can I withdraw my appeal? 

Yes, you may voluntarily withdraw your appeal request at any time prior to a final appeal determination being sent. If you choose to withdraw your appeal, then the award or eligibility status of your application will remain the same. You will be required to submit a signed letter to the Appeals Department stating that you would like to withdraw your appeal. To submit your signed letter requesting to withdraw an appeal, you may drop it off at a ReBuild NC Center via a curbside appointment, email it to your Case Manager, email it to appeals@rebuild.nc.gov, or mail it to the program at the following address:

ReBuild NC Appeals Team
ATTN: Homeowner Recovery Program
North Carolina Office of Recovery and Resiliency
PO Box 110465
Durham, North Carolina 27709

What if I do not agree with the program’s appeal decision? 

All appeals are final; your status in the program will be determined by the outcome of the appeal.

I don’t have receipts for the work completed. What else can I provide? 

If you don’t have receipts for repairs done on your home, you and your contractor(s) may instead complete the Contractor Certification, a form that allows you to certify the repair work completed. To receive a copy of the Contractor Certification, please request it from your Case Manager or by emailing appeals@rebuild.nc.gov. Supporting documentation should also be submitted with this form and may include a copy of a signed contract, scope of work write-up, paid invoice(s), receipts, or related proof of work completed. Scope of work write-ups and estimates must also include proof of payment.

What is the Contractor Certification, and why do I need it? 

In order to evaluate a request for an appeal, the program must verify any repairs completed to the damaged property for damages caused by Hurricane Florence or Hurricane Matthew. If the program has not received sufficient documentation to verify the repairs completed on your home, the Contractor Certification and supporting documentation can serve as additional proof of completed repairs to the damaged structure. The Contractor Certification should be completed by you and your contractor(s) and returned to the program, along with any supporting documentation, including any copies of signed contracts, scope of work write-ups, paid invoices, receipts, or any other proof that repairs have been completed.

What if my contractor cannot be located? 

If you are unable to reach your contractor, please provide this information in your Request for Appeal, including the contractor’s name, company name, and any contact information you previously used to reach the contractor. Supporting documentation should also be provided to the program, such as copies of signed contracts, scope of work write-ups, paid invoices, receipts, and any other related items that the program may use to complete a review of your appeal. 

I only have cash receipts; will the program accept them? 

The program may accept cash receipts as part of an applicant’s supporting documentation if they itemized, i.e., the receipts detail specific items purchased in order to complete repairs to the damaged property. Cash receipts must also be dated and include the applicant’s name or other identifying information. 

I need an extension for my appeal. How can I submit one? 

Contact the Appeal Specialist or your Case Manager.

How many appeals extensions can I have? 

You may request an extension for your appeal up to two (2) times for a maximum of ninety (90) calendar days after the date on your program determination letter. If your extension request is denied, the Appeals Team will send you an Appeal Extension Decision explaining why your extension request was denied.

How long do I have to wait to receive my new award letter? 

If your appeal is approved by the program, then you will have the option to accept the determination via the Selections and Confirmations page included with your appeal determination. From there, the program will begin updating or creating your award based on the appeal determination. While the timeframe for completing these updates and providing you with a new award letter may vary depending on the content of your appeal, your Case Manager will be able to explain the next steps and provide you with updates along the way.
 

Who will complete construction on my home? 

The program will either assign a general contractor to complete construction on your home or bid out the project through a competitive procurement to a list of prequalified general contractors. You will not receive any funds directly and will not do business directly with the general contractor. The program manages and completes the construction process on your behalf. 

Is there a person assigned to my case? 

Yes, the program will assign a Construction Liaison to act as your primary contact during the construction process. After the initial introduction, the Liaison will reach out to homeowners on bi-weekly basis to check on progress, respond to applicant questions or concerns, and ensure construction activities are being properly coordinated.

Who selects the general contractor that will perform construction on my house?

The program will either assign or award a general contractor to complete construction on your home in accordance with the terms of your grant agreement.

Does the program provide assistance to homeowners who are required to vacate their home and relocate during construction or reconstruction?

Yes. To reduce the burden on affected homeowners, NCORR offers Temporary Relocation Assistance (TRA) when rehabilitation, elevation, reconstruction, replacement, or environmental remediation activities require homeowners to temporarily relocate. To be eligible for TRA, homeowners must be required to temporarily relocate and must have a household income at or below 120 percent of the Area Median Income (AMI); homeowners are notified of their eligibility for TRA in their award letter. Homeowners who are not eligible to receive TRA but are requested to move before construction begins must cover all temporary relocation expenses.

What happens after I sign my rehabilitation, MHU replacement, or reconstruction grant agreement? 

Once you sign your grant agreement – i.e., accept your award and enter into a legally binding agreement with the program – the program will either assign or award a general contractor to your home and provide the general contractor with your home’s Scope of Work (SOW) and a Notice to Proceed (NTP) with construction. Prior to the start of any construction work, the construction manager will schedule a pre-construction meeting (or “walkthrough”) with you. The purpose of this meeting is to review all construction activities that will be undertaken.

What are the general contractor’s responsibilities during construction?  

General contractors are responsible for the following activities, along with others that may be included in the program’s construction policies:

  • Meeting insurance and bonding requirements.
  • Furnishing all necessary labor, materials, equipment, and other services needed to complete the scope of work on the applicant’s home in accordance with standards, quality, and state building code requirements.
  • Obtaining all required permits and inspections required by the local building department.
  • Coordinating progress inspections with the construction manager.
  • Performing construction as specified in a timely manner as noted in the construction contract and subject to liquidated damages as noted in the program’s construction policies and applicable contracts.
  • Performing all work in accordance with local building, health and safety codes, and Lead Safe Housing Rule (LSHR).
  • Disposal of all construction debris at a licensed construction waste landfill.
  • Completing and submitting all required closeout documentation to the program.
  • Ensuring that all materials, equipment furnished, completed systems, and work performed is free from defects due to faulty materials or workmanship for a period of one (1) year, two (2) years for any major system (i.e., HVAC system, septic system), and ten (10) years for structural work. 

What are my responsibilities during construction?

You are responsible for the following activities during construction, in accordance with your grant agreement:

  • Acknowledging the contractor’s right to access the property and home during construction.
  • Removing all personal property, fixtures, and appliances as necessary to complete construction in a timely manner.
  • Agreeing to release the contractor from liability for damages for disposing of any remaining personal property, fixtures, and appliances in the areas subject to repair and/or rehabilitation.
  • Maintaining compliance with program safety protocols (which may include refraining from being on-site during periods of construction work, as determined by the general contractor and construction manager).
  • Providing notice of defects within thirty (30) days of discovery.
  • Providing permission to the contractor to secure doors, change locks, temporarily partition areas and/or rooms of the home, or otherwise limit access in the home for areas and/or rooms under construction.
  • Providing permission for the construction manager, the general contractor, and the program inspector to take photos and/or videos of construction as it progresses.

Who do I contact if I have an issue during construction?

The Construction Liaison assigned to your home will act as the primary contact for homeowners.
After your initial introduction, the Liaison will provide you with the necessary contact information.
Any questions, comments or concerns can be direct to the Liaison, along with the program’s Construction Hot Line at 984-833-5356.

After the signing the grant agreement, when will construction begin on my home?

Once you have signed your grant agreement, your file will undergo review by the construction team. If able to proceed with construction, it will then be assigned to a Construction Liaison who will contact you to collect information pertinent to your construction project. After initial contact has been made, the Construction Manager will either assign your home to a contractor or bid out the work. Once a contractor has been selected, a signing event will be scheduled for you to review the construction contract with your contractor. A Notice to Proceed (NTP) will then be issued, allowing the contractor to begin work on your home.

When will construction on my home be completed?  

Although the program makes every effort to complete construction activities and mobile home replacements as efficiently as possible, ReBuild NC contractors have experienced delays in obtaining materials, and manufacturers have been unable to produce high volumes of MHUs, due to COVID-19. These circumstances are unfortunately out of the program’s control. If you have any questions about your timeline for construction, please contact your Construction Liaison or the program’s Construction Hot Line at 984-833-5356.

Will I receive a warranty for repairs/reconstruction completed by the program’s general contractor?

Yes, the program’s general contractors are responsible for providing a warranty that all materials, equipment furnished, completed systems, and work performed shall be free from defects due to faulty materials or workmanship for a period of one (1) year, two (2) years for any major system (i.e., HVAC system, septic system), and ten (10) years for structural work. 

Do I get to choose my replacement appliances and/or paint colors and finishes?

No, a standard unit is awarded. 

Does the program comply with Green Building Standards? 

Yes – all program construction complies with Green Building Standards that ensure construction is environmentally responsible and resource-efficient. ReBuild NC has adopted the Home Energy Rating System (HERS) standard for projects that were substantially damaged or where reconstruction is required. Homes that were non-substantially damaged must meet the HUD Community Planning and Development (CPD) Green Building Retrofit checklist, which is linked here via the HUD website.

What is a modular home?

An off-frame modular home is built in a controlled factory environment in sections and is engineered and built to the state or local building codes, where the home will be located and include sustainable materials (such as high-impact windows) well suited for long-term recovery and future resilience. Factory-built sections are then transported to the site, where they are installed on the foundation and completed by the general contractor.

Will my entire modular home be constructed in the factory?

No, the entire modular home will not be built in factory. There is still some construction that will happen at your home site including construction of foundation, installation of siding, flooring, remaining electrical work, and interior painting. 

What is the benefit to applicants with site-built homes to switch to a off-site home?

Off-site homes can be built faster and in a weather-controlled space allowing the applicant to return home sooner. The floorplan options, materials used, and building codes are the same between site-built homes and modular homes, so the only difference to the applicant is where the home is assembled.  

How does this affect me if my damaged structure was already a modular home?

This would not affect applicants with modular home structure types since the program already treats site-built homes and modular homes the same in relation to award types, floorplan options, and materials used.

Will the modular benefit allow me to get my home sooner?

For modular homes, applicants would not have to go through a bidding process as all applicants are assigned to the one general contractor responsible for all modular projects. Once an applicant reaches Step 6, applicants can expect to wait a few weeks to be contacted by a program construction representative to go over next steps with their general contractor. With standard reconstruction projects, applicants would still have to wait for a contractor to be assigned once the bidding process is complete. Applicants’ projects may have to go out for bid a few times before a contractor is successfully assigned. 

How soon will construction begin for a modular home?

While we cannot provide an exact timeline, due to eliminating environmental factors like weather and eliminating the contractor bidding process, modular homes may take less time than the site-built process.

Will my home look different if my home is a site-built home verses a modular home?

No, the floorplan options are the same for both modular and site-built homes. Regardless of whether the home is reconstructed on-site or built off-site (modular), the home will look the same. Floorplan options and sketches of the homes can be viewed here.

Is the modular benefit only for applicants with mobile homes (MHUs) on owned land?

No, modular homes will also be provided to applicants currently with a site-built home and eligible to receive reconstruction or reconstruction and elevation assistance.

Will my property value decrease if I receive a modular home? 

The type of off-frame modular home used by the program follows similar rise/fall trends for property value as compared to site-built homes and are often used comparatively in evaluating modular home values. 

If I already selected a floorplan for my reconstruction award, will I need to make a new selection for the modular home?

No, you will not have to change your floorplan selection. You will receive the same floorplan you selected in Step 5: Awards and Grant Signing. The only thing that is changing is where your new home will be constructed, whether it is completely on-site or partially in a factory. 

Can I customize the colors and flooring of the modular home?

 No, you will receive a standard modular home.