Frequently Asked Questions about CDBG-DR Assistance

Program Overview

Program Overview

My home was damaged by Hurricane Matthew and/or Hurricane Florence. Is assistance available for me?

Yes, assistance is available through ReBuild NC, which was established by the North Carolina Office of Recovery and Resiliency (NCORR) to assist North Carolina residents whose homes were damaged as a result of Hurricane Matthew on October 8, 2016, and/or Hurricane Florence on September 14, 2018. In summer 2020, the ReBuild NC Homeowner Recovery Program (HRP) will begin accepting applications from impacted homeowners. Eligible homeowners may receive assistance repairing, replacing, elevating, and/or reconstructing their damaged homes following Hurricane Matthew and/or Hurricane Florence. The Program may also provide reimbursement for repairs already completed.

I already completed a ReBuild NC application – should I complete another one?

No, if you already completed a ReBuild NC application during Phase 1 of the Homeowner Recovery Program (2017-2019), there is no need to complete a second application. Please call 833-ASK-RBNC (833-275-7262) to be connected with your Case Manager. If you previously applied and were determined ineligible for assistance, you may now be eligible due to policy updates. Your Case Manager will be glad to review the status of your application and assist you with any next steps.

I applied for assistance from another organization – does that mean I’m already signed up for ReBuild NC?

No, to apply for assistance from ReBuild NC, you must submit a ReBuild NC application. Assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Small Business Administration (SBA), Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP), a volunteer group, insurance, etc. is separate from ReBuild NC.

What counties are eligible for recovery assistance?

To be eligible for assistance from the Homeowner Recovery Program, your home must be located in a county that received a federal disaster declaration as a result of Hurricane Matthew and/or Hurricane Florence.

Hurricane Matthew-Impacted Counties
  • Camden
  • Chowan
  • Currituck
  • Edgecombe
  • Franklin
  • Gates
  • Halifax
  • Hertford
  • Martin
  • Nash
  • Northampton
  • Pasquotank
  • Perquimans
  • Wake
  • Warren
  • Washington
Hurricane Florence-Impacted Counties
  • Alamance
  • Alleghany
  • Ashe
  • Cabarrus
  • Davidson
  • Durham
  • Granville
  • Guilford
  • Madison
  • McDowell
  • Orange
  • Person
  • Polk
  • Randolph
  • Rowan
  • Stanly
  • Union
  • Yancey
Hurricane Matthew AND Hurricane Florence-Impacted Counties
  • Anson
  • Beaufort
  • Bertie
  • Bladen
  • Brunswick
  • Carteret
  • Chatham
  • Columbus
  • Craven
  • Cumberland
  • Dare
  • Duplin
  • Greene
  • Harnett
  • Hoke
  • Hyde
  • Johnston
  • Jones
  • Lee
  • Lenoir
  • Montgomery
  • Moore
  • New Hanover
  • Onslow
  • Pamlico
  • Pender
  • Pitt
  • Richmond
  • Robeson
  • Sampson
  • Scotland
  • Tyrrell
  • Wayne
  • Wilson

I need additional assistance to complete my ReBuild NC application. What should I do?

If your hearing or eyesight is impaired, or if you have a disability and may require additional accommodations, we are glad to assist you with navigating the application process. Please call 833-ASK-RBNC (833-275-7262) to speak with a program representative who will assist you accordingly.

Does ReBuild NC have interpreters available?

Yes, multilingual staff are available. Please call 833-ASK-RBNC (833-275-7262) to indicate what translation is needed. Si habla Español.

How is ReBuild NC ensuring homeowner safety amid COVID-19?

To ensure your safety and protect the health of our staff, ReBuild NC Centers are temporarily closed for in-person meetings. The North Carolina Office of Recovery and Resiliency (NCORR), which administers ReBuild NC, is monitoring public health guidelines regarding re-opening program offices and will re-open ReBuild NC Centers when it is safe to do so. NCORR also continues to evaluate overall efforts to ensure the health and safety of everyone served by the Program remains a top priority. Although ReBuild NC Centers are temporarily closed, please feel welcome to call 833-ASK-RBNC (833-275-7262) if you have any questions or would like more information about the Program.

Contacting the Program

Contacting the Program

I have a question about the status of my application.

If you have a question about the status of your application, please call your Case Manager or 833-ASK-RBNC (833-275-7262) to speak with a program representative. The program representative may direct your call to another team member who can best answer your question.

I need to change something on the application I submitted, and/or I need to submit additional documentation.

If you need to change something on your application and/or submit additional documentation, please call your Case Manager or 833-ASK-RBNC (833-275-7262) to speak with a program representative. The program representative may direct your call to another team member who can best answer your question.

I would like to submit a complaint.

Anyone may submit a complaint at any point throughout their participation in the Program by filling out a Complaint Form. The Complaint Form is available on the ReBuild NC website and may be submitted online, via phone, or at a ReBuild NC Center. To submit a complaint via phone, please call your Case Manager or 833-ASK-RBNC (833-275-7262).

Application

Application

How do I apply?

ReBuild NC launched Phase 1 of the Homeowner Recovery Program (previously called the Single-Family Housing Program) from 2017 to 2019, with Phase 2 launching in summer 2020. The Program will begin accepting applications soon for Phase 2. For the latest news about applying to the Homeowner Recovery Program, please monitor the Program website.

Is there a deadline to apply?

There is currently no deadline to apply to the Homeowner Recovery Program, and any deadlines that are established in the future will be announced by the Program. However, we strongly encourage anyone interested in the Program to submit an application as soon as possible.

What documentation is required?

In addition to a completed application, supporting documentation and forms must also be submitted. A complete list of all required documentation and forms is available on the ReBuild NC website.

I submitted my application – what is the next step?

An Intake Specialist will assist you with completing your application and ensuring you have submitted all required supporting documentation and forms. Once all documents have been submitted, the Program will begin a comprehensive review of your application. A complete list of all required documentation and forms is available on the ReBuild NC website. Once your application and required documentation are submitted, you will be assigned a Case Manager, who will be your point of contact throughout your participation in the Program.

The Program will review your application with regard to all eligibility criteria. If the criteria are met, the Program will then verify any disaster assistance you received from other sources, such as FEMA, SBA, and insurance, and contact you to schedule necessary inspections of your damaged home. Inspections will include an environmental review, a damage inspection, an asbestos building survey, and for homes built before 1978, a lead-based paint assessment.

Once the Program completes its review of your application, as well as all inspections, your award amount will be determined and made available for you to review. Once you review your award letter, you may accept the award, submit an appeal, request an award consultation, or withdraw from the Program.

An overview of the 8-Step Process is available on the ReBuild NC website.

Why do I need to stop work once I submit my application?

Federal law requires homeowners to stop all repair work on their damaged property once an application for disaster recovery assistance is submitted. Once your application is submitted, you must seek prior approval from the Program BEFORE conducting any repair activities, and only repairs that are considered “emergency repairs” will be approved. If you are currently under contract for repairs, you must notify the Program immediately using the Emergency Repair Request Form, including about your ability to end that contract and/or about the contract’s expiration. The Emergency Repair Request Form is available on the ReBuild NC website.

What is the definition of an emergency repair?

According to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, emergency repairs meet the following definition:

  1. Emergency repairs “do not alter environmental conditions” including any of the following:
    1. affect significant elements of properties listed on or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places
    2. replace, either through rebuilding or major rehabilitation of structures within a floodplain
    3. involve inappropriate occupancy of a known hazardous site or site contiguous to a known hazardous site
    4. involve work that could adversely impact the habitat of an endangered species; and alter a building’s footprint
  2. Emergency repairs are "limited to protection, repair, or restoration activities necessary to control or arrest the effects”: The activity does not include new additions, relocation, or enlargements, or changes to the primary use or density of occupancy; and includes work that:
    1. provides temporary protection from further damage to a building or that makes permanent repairs to a damaged building or structure
    2. is for the restoration of essential community services and related utilities and facilities to their condition prior to the disaster without significant change in size or capacity
  3. Emergency repairs are necessary “only to control or arrest the effects from a state or federally declared public disaster or imminent threats to the public safety including those resulting from physical deterioration.”

What types of repairs are considered emergency repairs?

Emergency repairs are those that do not alter the environmental conditions of the property, such as through rebuilding or major repairs, and are limited to repairs that are necessary to prevent imminent threats to safety, such as those resulting from physical deterioration from the structure following a disaster. Examples may include replacing an HVAC system, repairing roof damage, and repairing flooring at risk of caving in. If you would like request program approval of an emergency repair, please complete the Emergency Repair Request Form available on the ReBuild NC website.

Eligibility

Eligibility

Am I eligible?

Eligibility criteria for the Homeowner Recovery Program include:

  • Your home must have been damaged as a direct result of Hurricane Matthew and/or Hurricane Florence.
  • You must have owned the damaged home at the time of the disaster (Hurricane Matthew on October 8, 2016, and/or Hurricane Florence on September 14, 2018), and you must still own the home.
  • You must have occupied the damaged home as a primary residence at the time of the disaster.
  • You must be lawfully present in the United States. Individuals prohibited from receiving federal public benefits from the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act may not receive assistance from ReBuild NC.
  • Your total household income must be at or below 150 percent of the Area Median Income (AMI) limit.
  • The damaged home must be an eligible structure type and located in a disaster-declared county.

For more information about these and other eligibility criteria, please view the Homeowner Recovery Program Manual, available on the ReBuild NC website.

I sold my home – am I still eligible for assistance?

No, to be eligible for assistance from ReBuild NC, homeowners must maintain ownership of the damaged property throughout their participation in the Program. Applicants certify when completing the application that they understand they must not transfer the damaged property, or any interest in it, whether voluntarily or involuntarily, until they have completed all repair or reconstruction work through the Program and/or the Program has completed closeout of the application.

What structure types are eligible to receive assistance?

Eligible structure types include single-family homes, modular homes, manufactured home units (mobile homes), duplexes, condos/townhomes, and co-ops.

Ineligible structure types include second homes, foreclosed homes, detached structures (such as a garage or shed), properties located in a floodway (i.e., land that is federally designated for the discharge of floodwater), properties located in areas where federal assistance is not permitted, and structures that are used exclusively for business purposes and that are not a primary residence.

Verification of Benefits

Verification of Benefits

What is DOB?

Duplication of Benefits (DOB) is the receipt of funding from multiple sources for the same purpose. The Robert T. Stafford Disaster Assistance and Emergency Relief Act (Stafford Act) prohibits any person, business concern, or other entity from receiving financial assistance from Community Development Block Grant – Disaster Recovery (CDBG-DR) funding with respect to any part of the loss resulting from a major disaster for which they have already received financial assistance under any other program or from insurance or any other sources. It is an amount determined by the Program that may result in the reduction in the award value.

I received assistance after Hurricane Matthew and/or Hurricane Florence – how will this impact the assistance I can receive from ReBuild NC?

Receiving other means of assistance, such as assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Small Business Administration (SBA), U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), private flood insurance, or any other source for which funds are designated toward the rehabilitation or reconstruction of your structure does not disqualify you from receiving assistance from the Homeowner Recovery Program. However, it may impact the amount of funding for which you may qualify for. For more information, please view the “What is DOB?” FAQ.

I received an SBA loan – how will this impact the assistance I can receive from ReBuild NC?

If you applied for and received a loan from the Small Business Administration (SBA) for home repairs following Hurricane Matthew and/or Hurricane Florence, only the amount of the loan that was received will be considered a Duplication of Benefits (DOB). If you declined or cancelled all or a portion of the loan you were approved for, that amount will not be factored into your award calculation.

If I draw down more money from my active SBA loan, how will that impact the assistance I can receive from ReBuild NC?

You must sign and complete the Program’s Subsidized Loan Affidavit (available on the ReBuild NC website) stating that you will not accept any more of your available loan funds without ReBuild NC approval. A copy of the affidavit will then be sent to SBA. If you decide to accept more loan funds, the Program will consider that amount an additional Duplication of Benefits (DOB) and adjust your award calculation accordingly. For more information about DOB, please view the “What is DOB?” FAQ.

I had flood insurance – can I still receive assistance from ReBuild NC?

If you had a flood insurance policy in place at the time of the disaster and received flood insurance funds, it does not make you ineligible for assistance, although it may impact the amount of funding you receive. For more information, please view the “What is DOB?” FAQ.

I did not have flood insurance – can I still receive assistance from ReBuild NC?

If you were impacted by Hurricane Florence, your damaged property is located within the 100-year floodplain, you did not carry flood insurance at the time of the disaster, and your total household income is equal to or greater than 120 percent of the Area Median Income (AMI), you are not able to receive assistance from the Homeowner Recovery Program at this time. However, even if you do not think you will be eligible, you are strongly encouraged to still submit an application, as program parameters may change in the future. If you did not live in a 100-year floodplain and were not otherwise required to maintain flood insurance due to receiving previous federal disaster assistance, there is no program eligibility requirement related to maintaining flood insurance.

If you are unsure whether the damaged property is in a 100-year floodplain – also called a Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) – please visit FEMA’s Flood Map Service Center at https://msc.fema.gov/portal/home.

I previously received federal assistance after a disaster and was required to maintain flood insurance – can I still receive assistance from ReBuild NC?

If your damaged property received federal assistance after a previous disaster, e.g., FEMA Individual Assistance following a hurricane, and you were required to maintain flood insurance, you must have maintained continuous flood insurance since that time to remain eligible for additional federal assistance, such as a ReBuild NC award.

Inspections

Inspections

Why does my home need to be inspected?

The Program uses inspections for a variety of purposes, including identifying storm damage, completed repairs, and outstanding repair needs. Without completed inspections, the Program is unable to calculate your award, and you are unable to move forward in the Program.

What is a damage inspection?

During the damage inspection, a program representative will perform a detailed inspection of the interior and exterior of your home to determine what work remains, as well as what repairs have already been completed. All previously completed repairs will be documented in the Damage Repair Verification (DRV).

As part of the damage inspection, the inspector will determine whether an additional structural inspection is needed. For properties located in a Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA), the inspector will also assess the elevation of the property and whether the structure is elevated appropriately – to at least two feet above the Base Flood Elevation (BFE) and/or the highest water mark, whichever is higher.

The damage inspector will also create an itemized report of all remaining repair items, called the Estimated Cost of Repairs (ECR). The ECR is based on economy/standard-grade materials. Both the DRV and the ECR will be provided to you at the time of your award determination.

What is a lead-based paint risk assessment?

All homes constructed before 1978 are federally required to receive a lead-based paint risk assessment. The Program’s lead-based paint inspector will test your paint, take samples of the soil outside, and sample the dust on floors and windowsills inside. The assessor will need to inspect both the interior and exterior of the home.

What is an asbestos building survey?

All homes must receive an asbestos building survey, which is required by federal law to ensure that damaged properties are free of hazardous, asbestos-containing materials that could affect the health of the home’s occupants. During the asbestos building survey, the Program’s asbestos inspector will inspect the damaged property and take samples to determine whether hazardous materials are present, as well as determine any needs for their disposal.

What is an environmental review?

An environmental review is the process of reviewing a construction project to ensure it does not result in adverse impacts to the environment or cultural heritage, while also ensuring there will be no adverse environmental impacts on the project. This review process ensures the construction project complies with federal environmental and historic preservation laws, statutes, and executive orders. As part of this review, an environmental site inspection is performed. An appointment will be made for the inspection. While an environmental inspector will require access to the property, they do not typically require entrance into your home unless structural access is specifically requested when the appointment is made.

Available Assistance

Available Assistance

What types of assistance are available?

Stick-built Home Repair

Up to $70,000 for rehabilitation. Additional funds above $70,000 will be available for environmental remediation (lead-based paint or asbestos) and to address accessibility requirements and change orders, if required.

Reimbursement

For applicants with a total household income of 80 percent Area Median Income (AMI) or lower, up to $70,000 in reimbursement for out-of-pocket repair costs. For applicants impacted by Hurricane Matthew, these repairs must have been completed prior to submitting an application or September 14, 2018, whichever comes first; for applicants impacted by Hurricane Florence, these repairs must have been completed prior to submitting an application or September 14, 2020, whichever comes first.

Stick-built Home Reconstruction

Based upon actual bids to build program-approved and eligible floorplans.

Mobile Home/Manufactured Housing Unit (MHU) Repair

Up to $5,000 for single-wide mobile home repairs, and $10,000 for double-wide or larger mobile home repairs. The value of repairs will be determined by the Program damage assessment, and any repair value over $5,000 if the structure is a single-wide, or $10,000 if the structure is a double wide, must be replaced rather than repaired.

Manufactured Housing Unit (MHU) Replacement

Based on actual bids to replace the manufactured housing unit for single-wide, double-wide, single-wide with ADA compliance and double-wide ADA compliance achieved.

Elevation Assistance

Elevation assistance may be required for single-family homes or mobile homes located in a floodplain, or available to eligible single-family homes or mobile homes as an optional elevation award. Please note that elevation is not available for repair projects; if you elect to elevate your home or are required to do so by the Program, the Program will demolish and reconstruct your home to the correct elevation.

Temporary Relocation Assistance (TRA)

For households that are unable to occupy their damaged home due to program-related construction or environmental remediation during the Program’s construction phase (Step 7), up to $12,000.

Flood Insurance Assistance (FIA)

For homeowners with an income at or below 80 percent of the Area Median Income (AMI), and with home located within the 100-year floodplain, up to $2,000 for two years of flood insurance premiums.

The contents of my home were damaged by Hurricane Matthew and/or Hurricane Florence. Can the Program help with these expenses?

The federal dollars that were allocated to the State of North Carolina for ReBuild NC are only designated for structures, not contents.

Award Determination

Award Determination

How are awards calculated?

During the damage inspection, a program representative will perform a detailed inspection of your home to determine a dollar amount (based on economy/standard-grade materials) for the work already completed on your home and the work that remains. The Program will also review any disaster assistance you received from other sources, such as FEMA, SBA, or insurance. Because federal law requires the accounting of other benefits in calculating the award, the amount of other disaster assistance received for the relevant disaster event will be subtracted from the dollar amount determined through the damage assessment. These amounts will be considered against maximum potential program award amounts.

When should I expect to receive assistance from the Program?

Once you have submitted a complete application as well as all required supporting documentation and forms, the Program will begin a comprehensive review of your application. The Program will then review your application with regard to all eligibility criteria. If the criteria are met, the Program will then calculate any disaster assistance you received from other sources, such as FEMA, SBA, and insurance, and contact you to schedule necessary inspections of your damaged home. Inspections will include an environmental review, a damage inspection, an asbestos building survey, and for homes built before 1978, a lead-based paint assessment.

Once the Program completes its review of your application, as well as all inspections, your award amount will be determined and made available for you to review. Once you review your award letter, you may accept the award, submit an appeal, request an award consultation, or withdraw from the Program.

An overview of the 8-step Process is available on the ReBuild NC website.

I received a reimbursement award. Do I still have to complete the remaining repairs?

Yes, if you received a reimbursement and repair award, you must agree to allow the Program to complete the remaining repairs on your home in order to accept the reimbursement amount.

Why is my Damage Repair Verification (DRV) estimate less than the amount I spent to repair my home?

The DRV is based on a detailed inspection of completed repairs and utilizes economy/standard-grade pricing for each repair item. While the Program recognizes that homeowners may not have repaired their home using economy/standard-grade materials, the purpose of federal funding allocated to ReBuild NC is to ensure homeowners can get back into a safe, fully repaired or reconstructed home. As such, reimbursement funding is intended to cover the cost of necessary repairs rather than compensate homeowners for the full extent of their losses following Hurricane Matthew and/or Hurricane Florence. In utilizing standard, economy-grade materials, the Program also ensures that eligible homeowners receive the same funding for the same repair items and that available funding can assist the greatest number of applicants.

I received a letter from the Program regarding my eligibility or award amount, and I would like to appeal the decision. How do I submit an appeal to the Program?

If you would like to appeal the Program’s determination regarding your eligibility or award amount, please use the Request for Appeal Form available on the ReBuild NC website, which may be submitted via mail, email, or at a ReBuild NC Center. Please note that appeals must be submitted within thirty (30) calendar days of the date of your eligibility or award determination letter. If an extension is needed to submit an appeal, please call your Case Manager or 833-ASK-RBNC to request an extension.

If I receive an award from the Homeowner Recovery Program, will I be required to pay it back?

No, the Homeowner Recovery Program provides funding in the form of a grant, which does not have to be paid back unless you violate any of the Applicant Certifications included within the application or the terms of your grant agreement, which is a binding legal document between applicants and the North Carolina Office of Recovery and Resiliency (NCORR). Activities that will result in repayment of funds to the Program include but are not limited to: withdrawing from the Program while construction is taking place; receiving a reimbursement check but refusing to complete remaining repairs; and receiving additional disaster assistance that is considered a Duplication of Benefits (DOB).

Construction

Construction

Who will complete construction on my home?

If your grant agreement includes a repair or reconstruction award, the Program will either assign a general contractor to complete construction on your home in accordance with the terms of your grant agreement if the Estimated Cost of Repair (ECR) value is under $30,000, or bid out the project through a competitive procurement to a list of prequalified general contractors if the ECR is $30,000 and above. You will not receive any funds directly and will not do business directly with the general contractor. The Program manages and completes the construction process on your behalf.

Who selects the general contractor that will perform construction on my house?

The Program will either assign or award a general contractor to complete construction on your home in accordance with the terms of your grant agreement.

Does the Program provide assistance if I’m required to vacate my home during construction?

For households that are unable to occupy their damaged home due to program-related construction or environmental remediation during Step 7 of the Program, assistance may be available. If you will need assistance finding temporary housing, please notify the Program prior to the start of construction.

What happens after I sign my repair or reconstruction grant agreement?

Once you sign your grant agreement – i.e., accept your award and enter into a legally binding agreement with the Program – the Program will either assign or award a general contractor to your home, and provide the general contractor with your home’s Scope of Work (SOW) and a Notice to Proceed (NTP) with construction. Prior to the start of any construction work, the construction manager will schedule a pre-construction meeting (or “walkthrough”) with you. The purpose of this meeting is to review all construction activities that will be undertaken.

What are the general contractor’s responsibilities during construction?

General contractors are responsible for the following activities, along with others that may be included in the Program’s construction policies:

  • Meeting insurance and bonding requirements.
  • Furnishing all necessary labor, materials, equipment, and other services needed to complete the scope of work on the applicant’s home in accordance with standards, quality, and state building code requirements.
  • Obtaining all required permits and inspections required by the local building department.
  • Coordinating progress inspections with the construction manager.
  • Performing construction as specified in a timely manner as noted in the construction contract and subject to liquidated damages as noted in the Program’s construction policies and applicable contracts.
  • Performing all work in accordance with local building, health and safety codes, and Lead Safe Housing Rule (LSHR).
  • Disposal of all construction debris at a licensed construction waste landfill.
  • Completing and submitting all required closeout documentation to the Program.
  • Ensuring that all materials, equipment furnished, completed systems, and work performed is free from defects due to faulty materials or workmanship for a period of one (1) year, two (2) years for any major system (i.e., HVAC system, septic system), and ten (10) years for structural work.

What are my responsibilities during construction?

You are responsible for the following activities during construction, in accordance with your grant agreement:

  • Acknowledging the contractor’s right to access the property and home during construction.
  • Removing all personal property, fixtures, and appliances as necessary to complete construction in a timely manner.
  • Agreeing to release the contractor from liability for damages for disposing of any remaining personal property, fixtures, and appliances in the areas subject to repair and/or rehabilitation.
  • Maintaining compliance with program safety protocols (which may include refraining from being on site during periods of construction work, as determined by the general contractor and construction manager).
  • Providing notice of defects within thirty (30) days of discovery.
  • Providing permission to the contractor to secure doors, change locks, temporarily partition areas and/or rooms of the home, or otherwise limit access in the home for areas and/or rooms under construction.
  • Providing permission for the construction manager, the general contractor, and the program inspector to take photos and/or videos of construction as it progresses.

Does the Program comply with Green Building Standards?

Yes – Green Building Standards aim to ensure construction is completed in an environmentally responsible and resource-efficient way. ReBuild NC has adopted the Home Energy Rating System (HERS) standard for projects that were substantially damaged or where reconstruction is required. Homes that were non-substantially damaged must meet the HUD Community Planning and Development (CPD) Green Building Retrofit checklist. Additional information about Green Building Retrofit Checklist is available on the ReBuild NC website.

When will construction on my home be completed?

The construction timeline will depend on your award, environmental assessment findings, and the overall scope of work. From the time your home is assigned or awarded to a general contractor and the Notice to Proceed (NTP) with construction is issued, the general contractor can begin all related construction activities.

Will I receive a warranty for repairs/reconstruction completed by the Program’s general contractor?

Yes, the Program’s general contractors are responsible for providing a warranty that all materials, equipment furnished, completed systems, and work performed shall be free from defects due to faulty materials or workmanship for a period of one (1) year, two (2) years for any major system (i.e., HVAC system, septic system), and ten (10) years for structural work.

Do I get to choose my replacement appliances and/or paint colors and finishes?

After you sign your grant agreement, your general contractor and program Construction Manager (CM) will meet with you to provide information about the construction process. This will include reviewing your options for the colors and finishes installed as part of the repair or reconstruction process. Please note that all repairs and reconstructions will be conducted using economy/standard-grade materials.